UnitedHealthcare is teaming up with IRONKIDS for the second annual IRONKIDS Chattanooga Fun Run on Saturday, 9 a.m. EDT at Ross’s Landing, 200 Riverfront Pkwy. Kids ages 3-15 will have the opportunity to race on the same course as IRONMAN 70.3 Chattanooga athletes. The 1-mile and 1/4 -mile fun run is for “triathletes to be” and aims to help stem the rising tide of childhood obesity through exercise and healthy lifestyles. UnitedHealthcare mascot Dr. Health E. Hound will kick off the event with a warmup before the race.

The UnitedHealthcare IRONKIDS fun run returns to Chattanooga on May 16, 2015.
The UnitedHealthcare IRONKIDS fun run returns to Chattanooga on May 16, 2015.

Families and children in Chattanooga and the surrounding areas are encouraged to participate. The cost for registration is $15, and every child receives a T-shirt, race bib, goodie bag and finisher medal.  Registration details are available at www.ironkids.com. UnitedHealthcare is providing 50 free admissions to the Boys & Girls Club of Chattanooga, enabling youth to participate in a running event.

Event Schedule:

8:45 a.m. – warmups with IRONKIDS and UnitedHealthcare mascot Dr. Health E. Hound
9 a.m. – start of race
9:15-9:45 a.m. – finish line; every participant receives a medal

Did You Know the number of hours you sleep at night can affect your weight?

Seven hours of sleep per night help adults control their weight. In a study of more than 21,000 healthy adults, those who slept five hours or less per night were 50 percent more likely to become obese, compared to those who logged a full night’s rest. To learn about healthy sleep habits, visit sleepfoundation.org.

March’s topics include overweight children, building young families and neonatal abstinence syndrome.

Dr. Michelle Fiscus, president of the Tennessee Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, talks about addressing the issue of overweight and obesity in children.

Representatives from March of Dimes discuss an innovative program called Tied Together, a dynamic parent education program designed to build on the strengths of young families.

Substance abuse during pregnancy can result in agonizing drug withdrawal for the newborn. Karen D’Apolito, director of the neonatal nurse practitioner program at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing and March of Dimes volunteer, talks about this growing concern and the steps being taken in Tennessee to help prevent it.

Dr. Michelle Fiscus, president of the Tennessee Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, talks about addressing the issue of overweight and obesity in children.

Did you know children who are overweight or obese as preschoolers are five times as likely as normal-weight children to be overweight or obese as adults?

Obese children are more likely to become obese adults and suffer lifelong physical and mental health problems as a result. Ask your pediatrician about community resources that promote healthy eating and active living, and set a good example by modeling healthy behaviors for your kids.

Did you know that diabetes affects nearly 10 percent of all Americans?

According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 29 million Americans had diabetes in 2012. In Tennessee, nearly 12 percent of adults are diabetic, according to data from United Health Foundation’s America’s Health Rankings. You can lower your risk of developing this deadly disease by maintaining a healthy weight, eating healthy foods like fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and getting plenty of physical activity.

Diabetes is a growing epidemic in America and Tennessee alike, and a healthy lifestyle is the first step in combating this disease. Diabetes Educator Sarah Neil Pilkinton from Williamson Medical Center shares some nutrition guidelines and lifestyle choices.

While making the choice to live healthier can be difficult, “Healthier Tennessee” is dedicated to encouraging Tennesseans to live healthier lives. Rick Johnson from The Governor’s Foundation for Health and Wellness talks about Healthier Tennessee and the small steps you can take that add up to a healthier life.

Did you know that even modest weight loss can provide big health benefits?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, if you are overweight, moderate weight loss of just 5 to 10 percent of our total body weight can help improve blood pressure, blood pressure and blood sugars. In addition to improving your health, maintaining a healthy weight loss can also improve energy levels, physical mobility, general mood and self-confidence.